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Robert S. Gordon, Jr. Lecture in Epidemiology

The Robert S. Gordon, Jr. Lecture was established in 1995 in tribute to Dr. Gordon for his outstanding contributions to the field of epidemiology and for his distinguished service to the National Institutes of Health. The award is made annually to a scientist who has contributed significantly to the field of epidemiology or clinical trials research. The Lectureship is awarded by the NIH on the recommendation of the NIH Epidemiology and Clinical Trials Interest Group and is organized by the ODP.

The Gordon Lecture is part of NIH's Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series (WALS), which was organized in 1994 by the Office of Intramural Research to invite distinguished scientists to present topics of broad scientific interest to a cross-section of NIH researchers.

2017 Award Winner

Mark Schiffman, M.D., M.P.H.

Mark Schiffman, M.D., M.P.H.

Senior Investigator, Clinical Genetics Branch, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics (DCEG)

Upcoming Lecture

The Changing Epidemiology of HPV and Cervical Cancer: From Etiology, to Validation of Prevention Methods, to Dissemination

May 3, 2017
3:00–4:00 p.m.
NIH Campus
Masur Auditorium (Building 10)
Bethesda, Maryland

About the Lecture

Over three decades of studies moving from etiology to preventive methods research to guidelines development, Dr. Schiffman has learned some broad lessons about the strengths and weaknesses of epidemiology that he will describe.

About Mark Schiffman, M.D., M.P.H.

Mark Schiffman, M.D., M.P.H., External Website Policy is a Senior Investigator at the National Cancer Institute in the Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics, Clinical Genetics Branch. He received an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.P.H. in epidemiology from The Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He joined the NCI as a Staff Fellow in 1983 and, in 1996, was appointed Chief of the Interdisciplinary Studies Section in the Environmental Epidemiology Branch (which later became the HPV Research Group in the Hormonal and Reproductive Epidemiology Branch). He joined the Clinical Genetics Branch in October 2009 to study intensively why HPV is such a powerful carcinogenic exposure, akin to an acquired genetic trait with high penetrance for a cancer phenotype. The main studies in which Dr. Schiffman played a major role in the past 5 years, listed chronologically, include: The Portland Kaiser Cohort; the Taiwan Cohort Study; the Guanacaste Natural History Study; the ASCUS-LSIL Triage Study (ALTS); the Study to Understand Cervical Cancer Early Endpoints and Determinants (SUCCEED/Biopsy); the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT); the Persistence and Progression (PaP) Study; and Nigeria Project Itoju. These studies overall have related HPV status to outcome for more than 100,000 women.

Previous Lectures:

2016

Michael B. Bracken, Ph.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.E.
Susan Dwight Bliss Professor of Epidemiology (Chronic Diseases) and Professor of Neurology and of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences
Co-Director, Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology
Yale School of Public Health
Inefficiency and Waste in Biomedical Research: How Prevalent Is It, What Are Its Causes, and How Is It Prevented?

2015

Shiriki K. Kumanyika, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Professor Emerita of Epidemiology in the Department of Biostatistics & Epidemiology
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Research Directions for Solving the Obesity Epidemic in High-Risk Populations

2014

Moyses Szklo, M.D., Dr.P.H., M.P.H. External Website Policy
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore
Epidemiology: Back to Translation (PDF - 370 KB)

2013

Mitchell Gail, M.D., Ph.D.
Division of Cancer Epidemiology & Genetics, National Cancer Institute
Using Risk Models for Breast Cancer Prevention (PDF - 476KB)

2012

Lewis H. Kuller, M.D., Dr.P.H.
University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health
The Obesity Epidemic: Why Have We Failed? (PDF - 234KB)

2011

Jonathan Samet, M.D.
Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore
Big Epidemiology for Big Problems

2010

Julie E. Buring, Sc.D.
Harvard Medical School, Boston
What Do We Do When Studies Disagree?

Previous Lectures